Title

Woman´s ¨Terno¨ from Maní

China poblana

YUCATAN

Ethnic group: Mestiza

Heading 2

Donated by Angeles López-Portillo de Stiteler

Jubón, 2013

Made by María Dora Cajúm y Tox. Square of white cotton with flowers in cross-stitch hand embroidery, edged with industrial lace strips, and joined at the neckline to the huipil.

Huipil, 2013

Made by María Dora Cajúm y Tox. White cotton dress that falls to the knees, with bottom edging of cross-stitch embroidery with the same flower pattern as the jubón and trimmed in industrial lace.

Fustán, 2013

Made by María Dora Cajúm y Tox. White cotton skirt with edging of cross-stitch embroidery with same flower pattern as the jubón and trimmed in industrial lace.

CHAT: We know that embroidery was in Yucatan prior to the arrival of the Spanish because remnants of ¨Chuy K´ab,¨ or satin-stitched embroidery were found in the Sacred Cenote at Chichén Itzá. The Yucatan terno is the gala dress of women from Yucatan. It is an indigenous-Spanish fusion. In his book ¨Relación de las cosas de Yucatán,¨ Fray Diego de Landa, a Franciscan monk who arrived in Yucatan in 1547 and who was bishop from 1572-1579, wrote of the typical clothing of the women of the region. ¨The indians are very modest with their clothing because they wrap their bodies with a long fabric [fustán] that covers the chest with a square cover [jubón]. The rest wear a large and wide shift that is open at the sides and reaches to the thighs [huipil].¨ The Spanish nuns taught mayan women how to work in the European style, using cross-stitch embroidery in forms of brilliantly colored flowers and birds.